Add the Benefit of Feng Shui into Your Backyard

win454__91599.jpg Introducing feng shui design into your yard will help circulate its energy into your home and your life.

When incorporating feng shui design into your gardden, even a very small space works. Of course, a big area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller spaces as well.

Feng shui techniques are the same whether you are working in your garden or your residence. In order to learn the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first have to understand your home’s bagua.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should understand how to utilize each of them to maximize the energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is important to integrate it. This could be the perfect spot to put a meditative Zen garden with some beautiful stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Think about introducing a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Water Fountains: A Must in any Japanese Landscapes

A water feature is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. Since Japanese water fountains are seen as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned at the entrance of buildings or shrines. It is uncommon to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains since the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Bamboo is a common material to use for spouts and therefore often incorporated into water fountains. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be designed to appear as if it has been out in the open for a long time. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more interconnected with nature. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decoration.

If you are looking for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain crafted of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. Over the years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss covers the stone.

If you are lucky enough to have a big piece of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Lots of people put in a koi pond or a tiny stream as a final touch.

There are other options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. It is appropriate to use representations of water in lieu of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones.

The illusion of a creek with moving water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

Anglo-Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the eleventh century irreparably improved The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. But the Normans had to pacify the whole territory before they could focus on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Castles were more basic constructions and often built on blustery hills, where their people devoted both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were large stone buildings, mostly positioned in the widest, most fruitful hollows. The calm method of gardening was unlikely in these dismal bastions. The purest example of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent in modern times is Berkeley Castle. The keep is reported to have been created during the time of William the Conqueror. A spacious terrace meant for strolling and as a means to stop attackers from mining under the walls runs around the building. On one of these terraces lies a quaint bowling green: it's coated in grass and flanked by an old yew hedge that is formed into the shape of rough ramparts.

A Magnificent Example of Roman Know-How: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Waterwork

Both Christian and pagan relics have been found in by the load by archaeologists and restorers scouring the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. Situated in the portico of the nearby basilica one can find the acclaimed marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth). Due to the fact that the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was situated off the beaten track, it remained relatively unknown. For the most part, people stayed away from the area because it was a drab and neglected part of the city. It was then that the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was mandated by Pope Clement XI to erect a fountain in the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in an effort to make the area more popular. August 11. 1717 was when work on the church’s foundation began. After blessing of the first stone, medals bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were tossed into the foundation.

Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Solutions

With the development of the first elevated aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, people who lived on the city’s hills no longer had to rely solely on naturally-occurring spring water for their needs. Throughout this period, there were only 2 other innovations capable of providing water to higher areas, subterranean wells and cisterns, which amassed rainwater.

From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill by way of the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made available by pozzi, or manholes, that were installed along its length when it was first developed. Although they were primarily designed to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started using the manholes to gather water from the channel, commencing when he acquired the property in 1543. The cistern he had made to obtain rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water requirements. By using an orifice to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was able to satisfy his water needs.

A Smaller Garden Area? You Can Own a Water Feature too!

Since water makes a reflection, small spaces will appear bigger. Water features such as fountains benefit from the reflective attributes stemming from dark materials. If your objective is to highlight your new feature at night, underwater lights in various colors and shapes will do the trick. Solar powered eco-lights are great during the day and submerged lights are perfect for nighttime use. Often utilized in natural therapies, they help to lessen anxiety and tension with their calming sounds.

The greenery in your garden is the perfect place to situate your water feature. People will be focused on the pond, artificial river or fountain in your garden. Water features make great additions to both large gardens or small patios. The best way to perfect the ambience, position it in a good place and use the right accompaniments.


Water Transport Solutions in Early Rome
Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, started out delivering the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had relied on natural springs up till then. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and... read more
The Genesis Of Garden Fountains
Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for open spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational gatherings. read more
Anglo Saxon Grounds During the Norman Conquest
The arrival of the Normans in the latter half of the 11th century considerably modified The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But the Normans had to pacify... read more