Enrich Your Yard with the Aid of Feng Shui

Feel the health benefits of feng shui by incorporating its design elements into your yard. ft_199__26391.jpg

Do not be concerned if your yard is considered too small for feng shui design, as size is relatively unimportant. Of course, a large area is great if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller spaces as well.

Whether you are adding feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. In order to understand the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first have to know your home’s bagua.

It is also essential to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to maximize its energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should include in the northeast part of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. Since rocks epitomize the Earth element in feng shui, you might think about putting some into a tranquil Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

People thinking about including a water element into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Waterwork Worthy of Visiting

Both Christian and pagan artifacts have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth} is a renowned marble sculpture situated in the portico of the nearby basilica. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was not well known and situated far from sight making it difficult to visit. The part of town where it was situated was depressing and bleak which was enough to keep people away. It was then that the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to build a fountain in the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in an effort to make the area more popular. August 11. 1717 was the date when work on the church’s infrastructure began. The consecration of the first rock to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being thrown in showing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Where did Fountains Originate from?

The amazing or decorative effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, in addition to supplying drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Pure functionality was the original role of fountains. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs nearby. Up until the nineteenth, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, such as aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Artists thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and celebrate the artist responsible for creating it. The main components used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly illustrating animals or heroes. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create smaller depictions of the gardens of paradise. Fountains enjoyed a significant role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by adding beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Urban fountains built at the end of the nineteenth served only as decorative and celebratory ornaments since indoor plumbing provided the essential drinking water. Gravity was substituted by mechanical pumps in order to enable fountains to bring in clean water and allow for amazing water displays.

Nowadays, fountains decorate public spaces and are used to pay tribute to individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

The Influence of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Landscaping

Anglo-Saxons experienced extraordinary adjustments to their day-to-day lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But there was no time for home life, domestic design, and decoration until the Normans had overcome the whole region. Castles were more basic constructions and often constructed on blustery hills, where their tenants devoted both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were considerable stone buildings, commonly located in the widest, most fruitful hollows. Gardening, a quiet occupation, was unfeasible in these fruitless fortifications. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is exemplified in Berkeley Castle, which is perhaps the most untouched example we have. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time period.

A massive terrace serves as a hindrance to intruders who would try to mine the walls of the building. On one of these parapets is a picturesque bowling green covered in grass and enclosed by an aged hedge of yew that has been shaped into coarse battlements.

A Glimpse into the Origins of Outdoor Water Fountains

As the head of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to commission translations of invaluable texts from their original Greek into Latin. Continuing in his quest to make the city worthy of being called the capital of the Christian world, he decided to enhance the beauty of the city as well. The damaged Roman aqueduct which had carried potable drinking water in the into the capital city from countless miles away was restored beginning in 1453 at his request. Nicholas V also revived the Roman custom of installing grand fountains, referred to as mostras, to mark the end point of the aqueduct. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by him to build a water fountain where we now find the breath-taking Trevi Fountain. The water which ultimately supplied the Trevi Fountain, as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona, came from the renovated and altered aqueduct.

Water Delivery Solutions in Early Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, started supplying the individuals living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had depended on natural springs up till then. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people living at higher elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean segments to provide water to Pincian Hill. During the length of the aqueduct’s channel were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. While these manholes were created to make it much easier to sustain the aqueduct, it was also possible to use containers to pull water from the channel, which was employed by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he purchased the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. He didn’t get adequate water from the cistern that he had manufactured on his property to gather rainwater. To give himself with a much more streamlined system to obtain water, he had one of the manholes opened up, providing him access to the aqueduct below his residence.


Anglo Saxon Landscapes at the Time of the Norman Conquest
Anglo-Saxons felt incredible adjustments to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in... read more
The Results of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Gardens
Anglo-Saxons felt incredible adjustments to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. Architecture and horticulture were ... read more
Keeping Your Water Wall Fountain Tidy
One final recommendation for keeping your fountain in top working order is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full. Allowing the water level to... read more
Installing a Wall Fountain In Smaller Yards
Your outdoor vegetation is a fantastic place to incorporate in your water feature. People will be focused on the pond, artificial river or fountain in your garden. The flexibility of water features is... read more