The Genesis Of Outdoor Fountains

The amazing or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as supplying drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly functional. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, from aqueducts or springs nearby. win454__91599.jpg Used until the 19th century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their origin of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from the power of gravity. Designers thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and celebrate the designer responsible for building it. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly illustrating animals or heroes. Muslims and Moorish garden designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his superiority over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains made to mark the place of entry of Roman aqueducts.

Urban fountains made at the end of the 19th century functioned only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the necessary drinking water. Impressive water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the force of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Contemporary fountains are used to adorn public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.

The Demand for Water Features in Japanese Landscapes

Japanese gardens typically have a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are viewed as emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned at the entrance of buildings or shrines. Since water is meant to be the focal point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very simple.

You will also find many fountains that have spouts built of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be made of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. It ought to have a worn-down, weathered look as well. So that the fountain appears at one with nature, people normally decorate it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decoration.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain decorated with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. In time, as moss progressively covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

More substantial water features can be created if there is enough open land. Lots of people put in a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

There are other alternatives if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. It is okay to use representations of water in place of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. You can also collect flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

The Origins of Modern Outdoor Wall Fountains

The Roman scholar Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455) took the initiative to have hundreds of historic Greek texts translated into Latin. Turning the city into the deserving capital of the Christian community was important to him, so he also took steps to embellish it. Beginning in 1453, he called for the restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a wrecked Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away. Nicholas V also revived the Roman convention of installing imposing fountains, known as mostras, to mark the end point of the aqueduct. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by him to build a water fountain where we now find the breath-taking Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had refurbished included changes and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply the necessary water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

The Splendid Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Feature in Rome

Archaeologists and restorers on the lookout for pagan and Christian antiquities in Rome have come upon an abundance of them in the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin. The nearby basilica is largely renowned for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its entryway. Due to the fact that the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was located off the beaten track, it remained relatively unknown. For the most part, visitors stayed away from the area because it was a drab and neglected part of the city. As part of a project to revitalize the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to take on the job. August 11. 1717 was the date when work on the church’s foundation began. The blessing of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being tossed in bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Original Water Delivery Solutions in Rome

Rome’s 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, citizens living at higher elevations had to rely on local streams for their water. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole techniques available at the time to supply water to locations of high elevation. Starting in the sixteenth century, a new strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean sectors to provide water to Pincian Hill. Pozzi, or manholes, were built at regular intervals along the aqueduct’s channel. While these manholes were created to make it much easier to preserve the aqueduct, it was also feasible to use buckets to remove water from the channel, which was practiced by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his passing in 1552. The cistern he had constructed to gather rainwater wasn’t sufficient to meet his water needs. To provide himself with a much more streamlined way to obtain water, he had one of the manholes exposed, offering him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

Enrich Your Yard with the Use of Feng Shui

Incorporating feng shui design into your yard will help spread its energy into your home and your life.

Do not worry if your garden is considered too little for feng shui design, as size is relatively unimportant. If you have a lavish, charming one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

The same tools you employ to introduce feng shui design into your home can be used in the garden. The initial part is to figure out the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is vital to start by understanding how to bolster each of its five elements.

The Earth element, for example, should be integrated in the northeast part of your garden which connects to the personal growth and self-cultivation energy in feng shui design. Since rocks symbolize the Earth element in feng shui, you might give some thought to putting some into a serene Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

A water feature is a perfect add-on to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).


Rome’s First Water Transport Systems
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Anglo-Saxon Landscapes at the Time of the Norman Conquest
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