Beautiful Garden Multi-Tiered Water Fountains

For a long time now, multi-tiered fountains have been popular, especially in gardens. These kinds of fountains are common in Italy, Spain, and other Mediterranean nations. While they can be found anywhere, they are most common in the center of building complexes and in popular areas where people gather. Impressive carvings can be found on some of the most lavish tiered fountains, while others have less complex designs.

Traditional or classic settings are perfect spots for them. y96591_close__53985.jpg If done correctly, anyone seeing the fountain will believe it has been there for many years.

A Back Story of Outdoor Fountains

Countless of ancient Greek documents were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V who led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. Continuing in his quest to make the city worthy of being called the seat of the Christian world, he decided to embellish the beauty of the city as well. In 1453 he commissioned the repairing of the Aqua Vergine, an ancient Roman aqueduct which had brought clean drinking water into the city from many miles away. Nicholas V also embarked on the building of mostras, an ancient Roman practice of putting up imposing public fountains to indicate the terminal point of an aqueduct. The Trevi Fountain now occupies the area previously filled with a wall fountain crafted by Leon Battista Albert, an architect commissioned by him. The Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains found in the Piazza Navona and the Piazza del Popolo were eventually supplied with water from the modified, rebuilt aqueduct.

The Reason for Water Fountains in Japanese Landscapes

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered representative of spiritual and physical cleansing, so it is customarily placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. It is unusual to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains since the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains with built-in bamboo spouts are very common.

The basin, which tends to be made of stones, receives the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be made to appear as if it has been out in the open for a long time. So that the fountain appears at one with nature, people customarily adorn it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just attractive decor.

For something a bit more unique, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Before long moss begins to creep over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area begins to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

Bigger water features can be designed if there is enough open land. Charming add-ons include a babbling creek or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Many people choose to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water.

Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of flowing water.

Water Transport Solutions in Historic Rome

Rome’s 1st raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants residing at higher elevations had to depend on local springs for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at higher elevations turned to water pulled from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. To furnish water to Pincian Hill in the early 16th century, they applied the new process of redirecting the flow from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground network. The aqueduct’s channel was made attainable by pozzi, or manholes, that were added along its length when it was initially built. Whilst these manholes were developed to make it less difficult to maintain the aqueduct, it was also possible to use containers to pull water from the channel, which was practiced by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. Despite the fact that the cardinal also had a cistern to accumulate rainwater, it didn’t provide enough water. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat directly below his property, and he had a shaft opened to give him access.

Where did Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

The central purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains functioned using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Artists thought of fountains as amazing additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to supply clean water and celebrate the designer responsible for building it. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times utilized by Romans to beautify their fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to re-create the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to illustrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles.

Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by adding decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity enabled fountains to provide recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Contemporary fountains are used to adorn community spaces, honor individuals or events, and enhance recreational and entertainment events.

A Wall Fountain to Fit Your Decor

A small patio or a courtyard is a great place to put your wall fountain when you need peace and quiet. You can have one custom-built to fit your requirements even if you have a minimum amount of space. A spout, a water basin, internal piping, and a pump are essential for freestanding as well as mounted varieties. There are many different types available on the market including traditional, fashionable, classical, or Asian.

Freestanding wall fountains, commonly known as floor fountains, are noticeably big and feature a basin on the ground.

On the other hand, a water feature attached to a wall can be incorporated onto an existing wall or built into a new wall. This style of fountain contributes to a cohesive look making it seem as if it was part of the landscape rather than an added feature.


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