What You Will Need for a Garden Water Fountain

A water source and an electrical socket are two essential items that many people do not consider when determining where they want to put in their garden fountain. Sometimes new owners get so caught up in the romanticism of their new purchase that they forget vital details. twf034-ld__87434.jpg Most power cords are 12 feet long and call for a 120v outdoor socket, though an extension cord can always be added. You will also need to have a water source close by so that you can easily fill your water fountain. It is tough to move water from one place to another. A nearby hose can make filling the fountain a great deal less demanding. If you have an specialist on hand, you may want to consider getting a water fountain autofill with a connection to an external water line, as this would be much easier in the long run.

The Origins Of Outdoor Fountains

A fountain, an amazing piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also launch water high into the air for an extraordinary effect.

The primary purpose of a fountain was originally strictly functional. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs in the vicinity. Used until the 19th century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their origin of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from the power of gravity. Serving as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water.

Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often used by Romans to decorate their fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create mini variations of the gardens of paradise. To show his dominance over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. To mark the entryway of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the construction of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts arrived in the city of Rome

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity helped fountains to deliver recycled water into living spaces as well as create special water effects.

Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for community spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational activities.

The Impact of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Garden Design

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was significantly changed by the arrival of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The ability of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in design and farming at the time of the conquest. Still, home life, household architecture, and decoration were out of the question until the Normans taken over the general populace. Castles were more standard constructions and often built on blustery hills, where their people devoted both time and space to exercising offense and defense, while monasteries were major stone buildings, mostly positioned in the widest, most fertile hollows. The sterile fortresses did not provide for the calm avocation of gardening. Berkeley Castle is probably the most complete model in existence nowadays of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time period. As a method of deterring assailants from tunneling beneath the walls, an immense terrace encompasses the building. On one of these parapets is a picturesque bowling green covered in grass and bordered by an aged hedge of yew that has been designed into coarse battlements.

Disappearing Water Elements: Some of the Advantages of Having one in your Garden

Disappearing fountains sometimes go by the term “pondless” fountains. You cannot see where the water comes from, because it is underground.

Disappearing fountains add calming sound effects and striking visuals to any place where people get together. There are numerous types of them including millstones, ceramic urns, granite columns, and natural-looking waterfalls.

A disappearing fountain could be the most appropriate choice for you for many reasons. Any danger to anyone standing around it is averted since the water source is below ground level. This means that kids can safely be around it. Moreover, no water is going to evaporate because it is not subjected to the open air. As a result, your fountain will not use as much water as other kinds of fountains. It is extremely low-maintenance since it is underground and not exposed to dirt or algae. Finally, due to its reduced size, it is simpler to fit it where you want it than other types of fountains.

An Introduction to Stand-Alone Backyard Water Elements

People appreciate self-contained fountains for their easy installation and lower price. The plumbing, pump, and other materials come included with the fountain. Yet another name for a fountain having its own water source is known as “self-contained”.

Stand-alone water fountains are quite easy to install making them the best option for your patio or veranda. They are also not difficult to move from place to place.

Once you decide where you want to install your fountain, your landscaper should ensure that it is not too bumpy or uneven.

Any lumps can simply be evened out by your landscaper. You are now set to set up your water feature and fill it with water. The last step is to plug it into an outlet, a solar panel, or batteries.

The best alternative for anyone who wants flexibility and does not want to use external plumbing or water source is a self-contained fountain. Though a fountain can be a focal point anywhere in a garden, many people put them in the center. Cast stone, metal, ceramic, and fiberglass are just some of the materials used to build them.

Typical Water Fountains Found in Japanese Gardens

Japanese gardens typically feature a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are viewed as emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is supposed to be the focal point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very simple.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that includes a bamboo spout. The water flows through the bamboo spout and accumulates in the stone basin below. It should have a worn-down, weathered feel as well. People want their fountain to appear as natural as possible, so they put plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just nice decoration.

For something a bit more unique, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

If you are blessed enough to have a big plot of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Lots of people add a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not necessarily need to have water in them. It is okay to use representations of water instead of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat stones can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a babbling brook.


Where did Fountains Begin?
These days, fountains adorn public areas and are used to honor individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs. read more
Anglo-Saxon Gardens at the Time of the Norman Conquest
The advent of the Normans in the later half of the eleventh century substantially modified The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. Engineering and horticulture were skills that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time... read more
The Impact of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Gardens
The Anglo-Saxon way of life was drastically changed by the appearance of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The skill of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in design and farming at the time of... read more