How Feng Shui Turn Your Garden into an Oasis

Incorporating feng shui design into your yard will help spread its energy into your home and your life.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not especially important when adding feng shui design to it. It is terrific to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can always introduce feng shui design.

Whether you are introducing feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. brk-303-2__92712.jpg Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an extension of your home’s bagua, so it is important to figure out your home’s first.

Before getting started, make sure you grasp the five elements of feng shui so that you can make the most of their energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is essential to incorporate it. This could be the perfect spot to put a meditative Zen garden with some beautiful stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Southeast (money and abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life) are feng shui areas perfect for a water feature.

The Interesting Roots of the Fountain

During his time in control (1397-1455) of the Roman Catholic Church, the erudite Pope Nicholas V commissioned scores of translations of ancient Greek classics into Latin. Turning the city into the worthy capital of the Christian world was important to him, so he also took steps to beautify it. Beginning in 1453, the ruined Aqua Vergine, an historical Roman aqueduct which had brought clean drinking water into the city from many miles away, underwent repair at the behest of the Pope. Nicholas V also undertook the building of mostras, an old Roman practice of putting up grand public fountains to indicate the terminal point of an aqueduct. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by him to put up a wall fountain where we now find the breath-taking Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains located in the Piazza Navona and the Piazza del Popolo were eventually supplied with water from the altered, rebuilt aqueduct.

Common Water Features Found in Japanese Landscapes

Japanese gardens usually include a water element. Since Japanese water fountains are considered symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts built of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, receives the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be crafted to look as if it has been outside for a long time. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. As you can probably deduce, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

If you are looking for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain made of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo.

In time, as moss slowly covers the rocks, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

If you are lucky enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of little pool, or even a meandering brook.

Japanese fountains, however, do not actually need to have water in them. Potential alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. The impression of a creek with running water can also be achieved by placing flat stones very closely together.

The Impact of the Norman Invasion on Anglo Saxon Gardens

The advent of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century considerably transformed The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. Nonetheless the Normans had to pacify the whole territory before they could concentrate on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Because of this, castles were cruder constructions than monasteries: Monasteries were usually important stone buildings set in the biggest and most fertile valleys, while castles were built on windy crests where their citizens dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense. The barren fortresses did not provide for the calm avocation of horticulture. Berkeley Castle, perhaps the most uncorrupted style of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists today.

The keep is thought to date from the time of William the Conqueror. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstacle to attackers intending to excavate under the castle walls. On one of these terraces sits a charming bowling green: it is covered in grass and flanked by an old yew hedge that is created into the shape of rough ramparts.

A Magnificent Example of Roman Talent: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

Archaeologists and restorers on the lookout for pagan and Christian antiquities in Rome have come upon a treasure trove of them in the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin. The nearby basilica is mainly famous for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its entryway. When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was constructed in 1719, it was off the beaten track and mostly unknown as a result. Since the nearby area was gloomy and mostly abandoned, people were not particularly interested in visiting it. It was then that the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to build a fountain in the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in an attempt to make the area more popular. The task of laying down the church’s foundation began on August 17, 1717. After blessing of the first stone, medallions bearing the illustration of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown into the foundation.

Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Systems

With the development of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s hillsides no longer had to depend solely on naturally-occurring spring water for their requirements.

Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone technologies around at the time to supply water to spots of greater elevation. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique system was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean portions to generate water to Pincian Hill. Through its original construction, pozzi (or manholes) were positioned at set intervals alongside the aqueduct’s channel. During the roughly nine years he possessed the residence, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi employed these manholes to take water from the channel in containers, though they were actually built for the intent of cleaning and maintenance the aqueduct. The cistern he had constructed to obtain rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water requirements. Thankfully, the aqueduct sat below his property, and he had a shaft established to give him accessibility.


The Genesis Of Wall Fountains
Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational events. read more
The Influence of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Landscaping
Anglo-Saxons felt great changes to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. Architecture and gardening were skills that the Normans... read more
The Outcome of the Norman Conquest on Anglo Saxon Landscaping
Anglo-Saxons experienced extraordinary adjustments to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. At the time of the... read more
Keeping Your Fountain Clean
Finally, be sure to have a quick look at your fountain every day and add water if you see that the level is too low. Low water levels can damage the pump - and you do not... read more